444.22  Arterial embolism and thrombosis of lower extremity
ICD-9-CM Code Details and Notes
Short Title: Lower extremity embolism
444.22 is a billable medical code.
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Applies to
   • Arterial embolism or thrombosis:
      • femoral
      • peripheral NOS
      • popliteal

Excludes
   • iliofemoral (444.81)

- ICD-9-CM Chapters, Sections & Parents

390-459 Diseases Of The Circulatory System

440-449 Diseases Of Arteries, Arterioles, And Capillaries

444 Arterial embolism and thrombosis

Includes:
   • infarction:
      • embolic
      • thrombotic
   • occlusion

Excludes:
   • atheroembolism (445.01-445.89)
   • septic arterial embolism (449)
   • that complicating:
      • abortion (634-638 with.6, 639.6)
      • ectopic or molar pregnancy (639.6)
      • pregnancy, childbirth, or the puerperium (673.0-673.8)

444.2 Of arteries of the extremities

ICD-9-CM Index References
• Disease, diseased arterial occlusive
• Embolism artery extremity
• Embolism artery extremity lower
• Embolism artery peripheral
• Embolism extremities
• Embolism extremities lower
• Embolism femoral
• Embolism lower extremity
• Embolism peripheral arteries NEC
• Embolism peripheral arteries NEC lower
• Embolism popliteal
• Occlusion arteries of extremities, lower
• Occlusion peripheral arteries
• Thrombosis, thrombotic artery, arteries extremities
• Thrombosis, thrombotic artery, arteries extremities lower
• Thrombosis, thrombotic artery, arteries femoral
• Thrombosis, thrombotic artery, arteries popliteal
• Thrombosis, thrombotic femoral artery
• Thrombosis, thrombotic peripheral arteries
• Thrombosis, thrombotic peripheral arteries lower
Synonyms & Definitions
SNOMED Clinical Terms Synonyms:
   • Atheromatous embolus of lower limb
   • Common femoral artery occlusion
   • Common femoral artery thrombosis
   • Crural artery thrombosis
   • Embolism and thrombosis of the anterior tibial artery
   • Embolism and thrombosis of the dorsalis pedis artery
   • Embolism and thrombosis of the femoral artery
   • Embolism and thrombosis of the popliteal artery
   • Embolism and thrombosis of the posterior tibial artery
   • Femoral artery embolus
   • Femoral artery occlusion
   • Femoral artery thrombosis
   • Femoral popliteal occlusion
   • Lower limb arterial embolus

Peripheral Arterial Disease

Also called: PAD

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of PAD is atherosclerosis. This happens when plaque builds up on the walls of the arteries that supply blood to the arms and legs. Plaque is a substance made up of fat and cholesterol. It causes the arteries to narrow or become blocked. This can reduce or stop blood flow, usually to the legs. If severe enough, blocked blood flow can cause tissue death and can sometimes lead to amputation of the foot or leg.

The main risk factor for PAD is smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.

Many people who have PAD don't have any symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include

  • Pain, numbness, achiness, or heaviness in the leg muscles. This happens when walking or climbing stairs.
  • Weak or absent pulses in the legs or feet
  • Sores or wounds on the toes, feet, or legs that heal slowly, poorly, or not at all
  • A pale or bluish color to the skin
  • A lower temperature in one leg than the other leg
  • Poor nail growth on the toes and decreased hair growth on the legs
  • Erectile dysfunction, especially among men who have diabetes

PAD can increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, and transient ischemic attack.

Doctors diagnose PAD with a physical exam and heart and imaging tests. Treatments include lifestyle changes, medicines, and sometimes surgery. Lifestyle changes include dietary changes, exercise, and efforts to lower high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Peripheral Arterial Disease

Also called: PAD

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of PAD is atherosclerosis. This happens when plaque builds up on the walls of the arteries that supply blood to the arms and legs. Plaque is a substance made up of fat and cholesterol. It causes the arteries to narrow or become blocked. This can reduce or stop blood flow, usually to the legs. If severe enough, blocked blood flow can cause tissue death and can sometimes lead to amputation of the foot or leg.

The main risk factor for PAD is smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.

Many people who have PAD don't have any symptoms. If you have symptoms, they may include

  • Pain, numbness, achiness, or heaviness in the leg muscles. This happens when walking or climbing stairs.
  • Weak or absent pulses in the legs or feet
  • Sores or wounds on the toes, feet, or legs that heal slowly, poorly, or not at all
  • A pale or bluish color to the skin
  • A lower temperature in one leg than the other leg
  • Poor nail growth on the toes and decreased hair growth on the legs
  • Erectile dysfunction, especially among men who have diabetes

PAD can increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, and transient ischemic attack.

Doctors diagnose PAD with a physical exam and heart and imaging tests. Treatments include lifestyle changes, medicines, and sometimes surgery. Lifestyle changes include dietary changes, exercise, and efforts to lower high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

   • Peripheral arterial embolism
   • Popliteal artery embolus
   • Popliteal artery occlusion
   • Popliteal artery thrombosis
   • Post-radiological embolism of lower limb artery
   • Profunda femoris artery thrombosis
   • Superficial femoral artery occlusion
   • Superficial femoral artery thrombosis

Deep Vein Thrombosis

Also called: DVT

Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the lower leg or thigh. If the vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem in the lung, called a pulmonary embolism.

Sitting still for a long time can make you more likely to get a DVT. Some medicines and disorders that increase your risk for blood clots can also lead to DVTs. Common symptoms are

  • Warmth and tenderness over the vein
  • Pain or swelling in the part of the body affected
  • Skin redness

Treatment includes medicines to ease pain and inflammation, break up clots and keep new clots from forming. Keeping the affected area raised and applying moist heat can also help. If you are taking a long car or plane trip, take a break, walk or stretch your legs and drink plenty of liquids.

   • Thrombosis of arteries of the extremities

Blood Clots

Also called: Hypercoagulability

Normally, if you get hurt, your body forms a blood clot to stop the bleeding. Some people get too many clots or their blood clots abnormally. Many conditions can cause the blood to clot too much or prevent blood clots from dissolving properly.

Risk factors for excessive blood clotting include

Blood clots can form in, or travel to, the blood vessels in the brain, heart, kidneys, lungs, and limbs. A clot in the veins deep in the limbs is called deep vein thrombosis (DVT). DVT usually affects the deep veins of the legs. If a blood clot in a deep vein breaks off and travels through the bloodstream to the lungs and blocks blood flow, the condition is called pulmonary embolism. Other complications of blood clots include stroke, heart attack, kidney problems and kidney failure, and pregnancy-related problems. Treatments for blood clots include blood thinners and other medicines.